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For example, the following edit was suggested:

Answer says 'yes', edit says 'no'

The proper way to do this edit would be:

  • to correct and refactor the answer with the correct information or
  • create a competing answer instead, and downvoting the incorrect answer.

The behaviour I am targeting is edits like:

edit: Well actually, you should do it this way

or

edit: This is wrong, the correct way is to ...

or the infamous

edit added by userXYZ

Can we improve the wording either above or beside the suggested edit window, emphasizing how an edit should work? (Detecting the word "edit" at the start of a line would be a bonus).

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In this case, the edit isn't actually an edit; it's a complete change of the intent of the answer. Just like we try not to change the intent of a question, edits should not change the intent of the answer, even if the answer is wrong.

The purpose of edits is to clarify the wording, and correct spelling mistakes (especially leet speak). They're not there to take somebody's question or answer, and change it from their intent.

If you think the answer is wrong, leave a comment. If you're feeling uncharitable, downvote. Suggested edits that change the intent of the answer should be rejected, for the drastic change reason, or type out something to let the suggester know that's not how it works.

Sidenote: I rejected this edit for that reason.


And I need to learn how to read. Yes, there should be extra text explaining that edits are not meant to be used to change someone's answer.

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