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Currently, if you click on 'Share', the URL that is generated uses the Stack Exchange URL, i.e.

https://gaming.stackexchange.com/q/...
https://gaming.meta.stackexchange.com/q/...

This could/should use our custom, shorter URL like so:

https://arqade.com/q/...
https://meta.arqade.com/q/...

Not only will this help solidify the site branding, but will result in share links using less characters in comments as currently lamented. What do you think?

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    Why has this been declined? I would like some reasons, please! Dec 17 '20 at 5:15
  • @ExpertCoder14 - Please see the below answer for some insight as to why this was declined
    – Robotnik Mod
    Dec 17 '20 at 23:15
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The mod team reached out to the Community Team for clarification around the decline. There are a few reasons at play:

  • Inconsistency - Unlike SE sites that use the custom domain as their primary address (such as Serverfault or Ask Ubuntu), arqade.com is just a redirect. So there are larger questions to be answered as to whether customizing the share links are a good idea or not.
    Speculation: This might, for example, require research into how this will impact Arqade's rankings in search engines etc.
  • Dubious value-add - The change is largely cosmetic - it wouldn't fundamentally change the site in a beneficial way, the current functionality still works and is 'correct', so it's more of a 'nice to have'.
  • Low-priority - SE has many, more pertinent bugs and feature requests to handle, and not enough people to get to everything, thus this was put into a low-priority bucket.

They did mention that it was a cool idea, and are open to revisiting this in the future, just not the near-term.

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I can currently only see advantages using the arqade URLs. Those being the ones you bring up :)

I do wonder, however, if their might be obscure reasons not to do so - our current redirect address is still gaming.stackexchange.com, after all. I have too little knowledge of how The Innernette works to fully appreciate redirects and the effect it has on (HTTP) requests, server load (not too much, obviously, but if e.g. it helps save energy, it might be a worthwhile reason not to), and that kind of esoteric intricacies.

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