19

In connection with the moderator elections, we are holding a Q&A thread for the candidates. Questions collected from an earlier thread have been compiled into this one, which shall now serve as the space for the candidates to provide their answers.

Every question was compiled, for a total of 10 questions - as noted, we selected the top 8 questions as submitted by the community, plus 3 pre-set questions from us (but with the help of some editing, "merged" one of the community-submitted and provided questions).

As a candidate, your job is simple - post an answer to this question, citing each of the questions and then post your answer to each question given in that same answer. For your convenience, I will include all of the questions in quote format with a break in between each, suitable for you to insert your answers. Just copy the whole thing after the first set of three dashes.Please consider putting your name at the top of your post so that readers will know who you are before they finish reading everything you have written, and also including a link to your answer on your nomination post.

Once all the answers have been compiled, this will serve as a transcript for voters to view the thoughts of their candidates, and will be appropriately linked in the Election page.

Good luck to all of the candidates!

Oh, and when you've completed your answer, please provide a link to it after this blurb here, before that set of three dashes. Please leave the list of links in the order of submission.

To save scrolling here are links to the submissions from each candidate (in order of submission):


  1. You (a moderator) and another community member both answer a question (not on Meta). The other answer is well written but (objectively) incorrect, and has gathered a similar amount of upvotes to yours. What do you do?

  2. A relatively new community member has shown misgivings about an established site policy and has a suggestion to change the policy. Their suggested change (posted on meta) isn't being well received by community regulars and the debate appears to be drifting in an unfriendly direction.
    How do you approach and respond to this situation?

  3. The Bridge, our main chat room, is one of the most active on the network. Do you see the moderation of Arqade's chat rooms as part of your duties? If you're not active in chat currently, would you consider it part of the job to keep an eye on what's going on there?

  4. Moderators are not selected because they are domain experts in certain tags, but it so happens that you are an expert in one such tag. You see that several members of the community have elected to close a question as a duplicate, but you see that the duplicates don't actually answer the question as stated, nor do they provide a useful signpost for the asker. How do you proceed?

  5. There is a high-rep user who is very active on the site, but frequently uses strong language which violates the Code of Conduct in their comments. When you warned them, they replied stating that the questions are of low quality which is why they left those comments. They also threatened to quit the site. Despite the warning, they continue to post similar comments. What steps, if any, will you take in order to address this situation? What if the comments were on Meta instead of main? Does that change your approach at all?

  6. We have a very active chat community, but at the end of the day, it is a very small part of our actual community. Sometimes, people discuss site policy in chat as if ruling decisions can be made there, instead of moving them to meta. How would you deal with this? How much value do you place on chat as a place of community consensus?

  7. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

  8. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?
    How do you react, in particular, if nobody has communicated with the moderator regarding this action, or disagreed with it through voting, posting on meta, or any other means?

  9. A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?

  10. As a moderator, would you use your binding vote to unilaterally approve and reject suggested edits, or would you leave these to the community review vote?

  • 4
    I'm interested in running for moderator, but not at this time. (I can't devote the time necessary to be as effective as I want to be), but I'm very curious how my answers to the above questions would be received. Is there a mechanism for that kind of feedback without cluttering up the answers of the viable candidates? (FWIW I'm fine with a "No, just wait until you want to run for real" as an answer, if that's the best option.) – Tim S. Jun 3 at 20:36
  • @TimS - The best place to gather feedback like that would probably be to make your own meta question, answering the questions and asking for feedback. The election announcement post says "If you have general questions about the election process, or questions for moderator candidates, feel free to ask them here on meta -- just make sure your questions are tagged [election]." – Robotnik Jun 3 at 22:53
  • 7
    I would like to ask the community to make an effort to keep every answer to this question at the same score, so as to not influence the vote of other users who might be swayed by seeing a highly upvoted candidate. – Wrigglenite Jun 4 at 7:21
12

Dragonrage

  1. You (a moderator) and another community member both answer a question (not on Meta). The other answer is well written but (objectively) incorrect, and has gathered a similar amount of upvotes to yours. What do you do?

The same thing I currently do, downvote the other answer and either leave a comment on the answer explaining why it is incorrect, or edit my answer to address why the other answer is incorrect. Just because I have the power to unilaterally delete it does not mean I would do so.

  1. A relatively new community member has shown misgivings about an established site policy and has a suggestion to change the policy. Their suggested change (posted on meta) isn't being well received by community regulars and the debate appears to be drifting in an unfriendly direction.
    How do you approach and respond to this situation?

Some combination of the following bullet points depending on the situation and which applied.

  • Delete any comments that violate the Code of Conduct.
  • Leave a comment reminding users to Be Nice.
  • Edit the question to help word the suggestion better if possible.
  • Write an answer to address their concerns/misgivings, and leave my opinion on the suggested changes.
  1. The Bridge, our main chat room, is one of the most active on the network. Do you see the moderation of Arqade's chat rooms as part of your duties? If you're not active in chat currently, would you consider it part of the job to keep an eye on what's going on there?

Yes, I see the moderation of the chat rooms as part of a moderator's duties. I am quite active in the Bridge and in some of the game specific rooms that pop up from time to time, however I am not active in TIF. I personally don't enjoy discussing politics, so I probably won't participate in much discussion in the TIF if elected as a moderator, but I would join the room and check in every now and then to keep an eye on how discussion is going.

  1. Moderators are not selected because they are domain experts in certain tags, but it so happens that you are an expert in one such tag. You see that several members of the community have elected to close a question as a duplicate, but you see that the duplicates don't actually answer the question as stated, nor do they provide a useful signpost for the asker. How do you proceed?

I probably would leave a comment explaining why I feel it is not a duplicate, and then proceed to cast a re-open vote. If anyone felt I acted wrongly, they could ping me in the comments, message me in chat, or create a meta post to discuss the question and how it should be handled. If they convinced me that it was a duplicate question, I would happily reverse my decision and close it again myself if needed.

Also, a few community members could also reverse my reopen by casting close votes of their own, and if I noticed that happening, I would more than likely create a meta question to discuss the question so the community could weigh in.

  1. There is a high-rep user who is very active on the site, but frequently uses strong language which violates the Code of Conduct in their comments. When you warned them, they replied stating that the questions are of low quality which is why they left those comments. They also threatened to quit the site. Despite the warning, they continue to post similar comments. What steps, if any, will you take in order to address this situation? What if the comments were on Meta instead of main? Does that change your approach at all?

Just because something is "low quality" does not mean that you can be rude. I made a meta question about this. In the case I saw this happening, I would do my best to work with the user to try and get them to understand where they are crossing the line and why it is not acceptable, and if necessary I would request another moderator to try and communicate with them to see if that would help. I would not want to lose someone who contributes a lot to our site, but if they refused to change their behavior, a suspension would be issued.

  1. We have a very active chat community, but at the end of the day, it is a very small part of our actual community. Sometimes, people discuss site policy in chat as if ruling decisions can be made there, instead of moving them to meta. How would you deal with this? How much value do you place on chat as a place of community consensus?

Chat is great for flushing out ideas and having real time communication with other users. It also in the case of the Bridge is typically full of very active, high rep users, who are passionate about the site. All of this is great, however chat is not meta, and most people would never see this discussion.

With that in mind, I would remind the users that after they came up with a proposition, to post it on meta for community review, and to link to relevant parts of the transcript so that others could read the discussion that happened and weigh in themselves. Generally speaking, most Bridge members are pretty good about doing this, so I would do my best to encourage them to keep doing so, or remind them if they forget.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Very similar to question #5. Valuable content does not exempt you from following the rules. I would first warn them and see if I could work with them to help them improve their behavior, or ask another mod to work with them if I don't have success, but if they failed to head the warnings, or refused to change their behavior, a suspension would be in order.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?
    How do you react, in particular, if nobody has communicated with the moderator regarding this action, or disagreed with it through voting, posting on meta, or any other means?

I would message the other moderator directly and try to resolve the issue between us. If it was a major issue or we cannot resolve the issue between the two of us, I would either ask other moderators to weigh in, or create a meta post to get input from the community.

  1. A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?

Nothing particularly new for me. I've had the same distinction on other sites. It will probably make me think things through an extra time before doing some actions like VTC, etc.

  1. As a moderator, would you use your binding vote to unilaterally approve and reject suggested edits, or would you leave these to the community review vote?

I can technically already do this with the Approve and Edit option. If I have extra time and the mod queues are empty I will probably continue to go through the other queues though I will be more likely to hit skip than before.

  • RE: Q4 - You may not know this, but note that moderators cannot cast regular close and reopen votes, a moderator 'vote' immediately closes/reopens the question. Given this information, does your response to Q4 change at all? – Robotnik Jun 4 at 1:21
  • 3
    @Robotnik, I was aware of that fact. The community still has the ability to overturn my reopening, and I am more than happy to discuss my actions on a particular question if the community feels I acted in error. I would probably only cast unilateral votes if i felt strongly or if other people had already voted. there is also always the option of dropping a comment on the question, in chat, or creating a meta post to discuss if i dont feel super strongly about the reopening. – Dragonrage Jun 4 at 1:26
  • 1
    Thank you for the response! I don't have any further questions as of now. Best of luck! :-) – Robotnik Jun 4 at 1:32
10

dly

  1. You (a moderator) and another community member both answer a question (not on Meta). The other answer is well written but (objectively) incorrect, and has gathered a similar amount of upvotes to yours. What do you do?

Granted that the other answer is really wrong I'd just do what I would also do without the diamond: leave a comment, down-vote it and hope for the poster to fix it. It is not for a mod alone to decide what answers are good or bad and a technically wrong answer is no reason to intervene. The community can decide based on my answer & comment and their own expertise whether or not that answer was actually worth their up-votes and eventually undo their up-votes.

  1. A relatively new community member has shown misgivings about an established site policy and has a suggestion to change the policy. Their suggested change (posted on meta) isn't being well received by community regulars and the debate appears to be drifting in an unfriendly direction.
    How do you approach and respond to this situation?

New ideas are always welcome, regardless of the user's status or reputation. Especially new users have a different view on things, so their input may even be more important. If the community consensus is against it, well that happens. But it is never ok to insult someone or to be unkind or unfriendly. If that happens, it is time to step in to remind them of the Code of Conduct and the Be Nice policy.

  1. The Bridge, our main chat room, is one of the most active on the network. Do you see the moderation of Arqade's chat rooms as part of your duties? If you're not active in chat currently, would you consider it part of the job to keep an eye on what's going on there?

I'm not active on chat, although I do visit it sometimes. Since the chat rooms are a part of Arqade, yes, I consider moderating them a part of a mod's duties. This doesn't mean that all mods must be active there at all times, but having an eye on the chat is certainly a part of the job.

  1. Moderators are not selected because they are domain experts in certain tags, but it so happens that you are an expert in one such tag. You see that several members of the community have elected to close a question as a duplicate, but you see that the duplicates don't actually answer the question as stated, nor do they provide a useful signpost for the asker. How do you proceed?

Reopen it, just like a user with a golden tag badge would do. Those users have earned their right by the community's trust and so did mods. When I'm absolutely sure I see no harm in taking direct action, so the question can be answered instead of staying closed for a couple of days and eventually scaring off the asker while it's being discussed on Meta. A small comment stating my point can help solving the situation even before it gets taken to Meta.

  1. There is a high-rep user who is very active on the site, but frequently uses strong language which violates the Code of Conduct in their comments. When you warned them, they replied stating that the questions are of low quality which is why they left those comments. They also threatened to quit the site. Despite the warning, they continue to post similar comments. What steps, if any, will you take in order to address this situation? What if the comments were on Meta instead of main? Does that change your approach at all?

The Code of Conduct is for everyone. High rep users are no exception. I would warn them a second time stating that low quality content is no reason to be aggressive. High rep users should as well lead by example, because they're the ones new users see first. If that still does not help a temporary suspension is in order. If they want to quit the site, that's their own choice. Meta doesn't change my approach.

  1. We have a very active chat community, but at the end of the day, it is a very small part of our actual community. Sometimes, people discuss site policy in chat as if ruling decisions can be made there, instead of moving them to meta. How would you deal with this? How much value do you place on chat as a place of community consensus?

The chat is a good place to discuss things before or next to Meta, but the chat can't replace a Meta discussion. Not everyone is active in chat and people may miss something that is being discussed there. Valuable input can get lost because of that, so a chat is not a good place for community consensus. People may discuss on chat as much as they want, but at the end of the day it should at least be summarized on Meta for everyone to see, so they can vote or reply.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

That really depends on the kind of flags and what the user is doing wrong. If the user violates the CoC I'd message them to watch their tone and just be nice. It is pretty much like question 5: Only because someone is active on the site they are not automatically free to be unkind. I'm not sure if there's a comment ban, but that would be the next step. They serve some time thinking about commenting and can still answer questions.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?
    How do you react, in particular, if nobody has communicated with the moderator regarding this action, or disagreed with it through voting, posting on meta, or any other means?

Talk to them. They'll have a reason for their action. Depending on the outcome either I'll know why they did it and accept the decision or they can revert it. Even if no user disagreed, I would still ask the mod about it.

  1. A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?

Oh, shiny!

I already try to "lead by example" on my active SE sites. As mentioned under question 5 I believe that high rep users should do that already and not just moderators. But yes, it feels great to have a shiny ♦.

  1. As a moderator, would you use your binding vote to unilaterally approve and reject suggested edits, or would you leave these to the community review vote?

Yes, if it's an easy vote and only if the queue keeps piling up. Rejecting spam or otherwise harmful content can be done unilaterally. Also simple tag edits are no issue. Other than that I'd leave it for the community to decide. They have earned the right to do so.

10

Unionhawk

  1. You (a moderator) and another community member both answer a question (not on Meta). The other answer is well written but (objectively) incorrect, and has gathered a similar amount of upvotes to yours. What do you do?

Delete votes and low quality flags are not for incorrect answers, and obviously binding delete votes and low quality flags are no different. So I would just do what I always do, leave a comment about what is wrong and vote down, while ensuring that my own answer is well sourced and correct.

  1. A relatively new community member has shown misgivings about an established site policy and has a suggestion to change the policy. Their suggested change (posted on meta) isn't being well received by community regulars and the debate appears to be drifting in an unfriendly direction. How do you approach and respond to this situation?

One of the key parts to maintaining a welcoming community is ensuring feedback is constructive, and a big part of a moderator's job is maintaining this. So in this case I would offer a friendly reminder that while discussion is what Meta is for, that discussion should still be constructive and friendly per the code of conduct, same as on Main, and action comment flags as appropriate.

  1. The Bridge, our main chat room, is one of the most active on the network. Do you see the moderation of Arqade's chat rooms as part of your duties? If you're not active in chat currently, would you consider it part of the job to keep an eye on what's going on there?

I don't think moderating chat is a requirement. The Bridge has decently strong moderator presence as it is, and things rarely escalate to an unmanageable point. That said, it is the job of moderators in chat to... moderate chat. And since I am active in chat, I would see this as part of my job.

  1. Moderators are not selected because they are domain experts in certain tags, but it so happens that you are an expert in one such tag. You see that several members of the community have elected to close a question as a duplicate, but you see that the duplicates don't actually answer the question as stated, nor do they provide a useful signpost for the asker. How do you proceed?

This is where the binding reopen votes part is tricky. It's also hard to judge without a particular case, and without a gold tag badge. Probably the first thing I'd do is ask other mods for advice or thoughts, but it doesn't look like I really have that option this time so.

In this sort of case, I would most likely post a comment with my thoughts on the duplication, and if someone offers a better duplication target, redirect the dupe closure there. We do want to make sure that we are helping users the best we can, after all. Otherwise, if I think it should just be reopened without a different dupe target or anything like that, then I'd most likely wait for the question to receive a few reopen votes first. After all, it did receive 5 close votes in the first place.

  1. There is a high-rep user who is very active on the site, but frequently uses strong language which violates the Code of Conduct in their comments. When you warned them, they replied stating that the questions are of low quality which is why they left those comments. They also threatened to quit the site. Despite the warning, they continue to post similar comments. What steps, if any, will you take in order to address this situation? What if the comments were on Meta instead of main? Does that change your approach at all?

Honestly, if somebody wants to quit because they are facing code of conduct related action, bye. Threats to leave by a high reputation user are not relevant to enforcing the code of conduct. If a user repeatedly does not follow the code of conduct in good faith after multiple warnings, they will be suspended. If a user who repeatedly violates the code of conduct wishes to delete their account, then they might find this link to be helpful.

Hopefully it doesn't get to this point though, and hopefully a quick follow-up to the effect of "you can't violate the code of conduct just because a post you're commenting on is bad, there are ways to address this sort of content in a clear and constructive manner" addresses the problem.

  1. We have a very active chat community, but at the end of the day, it is a very small part of our actual community. Sometimes, people discuss site policy in chat as if ruling decisions can be made there, instead of moving them to meta. How would you deal with this? How much value do you place on chat as a place of community consensus?

Chat is a great spot to kind of hash things out and forming opinions before forming those opinions into a meta answer, so I value chat as a place of consensus among individuals greatly. For example, the other day we had a discussion related to hardware that is not released, but is available for pre-order that I think was valuable. That said, it's not true site consensus without meta votes. In this kind of situation, I'd encourage those participating in the discussion to take their opinions to meta where they can be more properly hashed out into policy, but not discourage them from working through their thoughts on the subject in chat.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

This one is really the predecessor to number 5. User reputation doesn't change how comment moderation happens. If anything, higher reputation users should know better. If someone is repeatedly causing problems in the comments, I'd reach out to that person via comment, actioning any comment flags as appropriate.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?
    How do you react, in particular, if nobody has communicated with the moderator regarding this action, or disagreed with it through voting, posting on meta, or any other means?

The first thing I would do is talk to that moderator and ask about their thought process. Communication is key, and it's possible that they see something that I didn't think about. Plus, it's less than nonconstructive to just engage in a diamond-tools close/reopen, delete/undelete, etc/unetc war. Where we go from there depends on where that conversation goes, keeping in mind what powers the community has (10k users can't cast undelete votes on posts that have been deleted by a moderator for example).

  1. A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?

Honestly, that's fine with me. I take pride in all of my contributions, and don't have any problem with them having a diamond attached to them.

  1. As a moderator, would you use your binding vote to unilaterally approve and reject suggested edits, or would you leave these to the community review vote?

It depends. The suggested edit queue never really gets out of hand, and the community at large is more than capable of handling it. But, moderators are exception handlers, and you only need 2 reviewers to close a suggested edit anyway (or 1 if you select "reject and edit" or "improve edit" even), so I don't have as many reservations about using binding suggested edit votes as I do with binding close or reopen votes.

10

Wrigglenite's answers

  1. You (a moderator) and another community member both answer a question (not on Meta). The other answer is well written but (objectively) incorrect, and has gathered a similar amount of upvotes to yours. What do you do?

Voting posts up and down is one of the basics of curating content on Arqade and the Stack Exchange network as a whole. As such, I always vote up or down on posts that are part of my gaming expertise, and this example would be no different.
I would downvote the incorrect answer and, if the answer seems well-intentioned but is stating a common misconception or is using incorrect logic or maths, I would edit my own answer to address this wrong solution, and eventually comment on the incorrect answer that I've explained why it doesn't work. If the answer is easily verifiable as incorrect by playing the game, a simple downvote would suffice.

  1. A relatively new community member has shown misgivings about an established site policy and has a suggestion to change the policy. Their suggested change (posted on meta) isn't being well received by community regulars and the debate appears to be drifting in an unfriendly direction.
    How do you approach and respond to this situation?

A debate on its own is not unusual on Meta, and not necessarily something that requires moderation. If the tone of this debate is turning unfriendly and users are starting to lose their cool and a breach of the Code of Conduct seems likely, then a comment reminding everyone to be respectful would be appropriate. If the situation keeps deterioriating, it might be necessary to delete unfriendly comments and give a more stern warning.
From my experience, either the debate dies down after that, or people go back to discussing in a civil manner. If the discussion is still heated after a second warning, normal escalation of punishments - such as a short timeout - might be appropriate, depending on the specific circumstances and words being used.

  1. The Bridge, our main chat room, is one of the most active on the network. Do you see the moderation of Arqade's chat rooms as part of your duties? If you're not active in chat currently, would you consider it part of the job to keep an eye on what's going on there?

As a lurker of the Bridge, I would consider it part of my duties to keep everyone civil in chat; if I were not already a member of the Bridge, I don't think I would join it specifically to keep an eye out. If I didn't have a reason to join the chatroom, I would find it hard to be vigilant, and Room Owners would probably be more active and familiar with the chat than I could be.

For those reasons, I would not join other chatrooms for the explicit purpose of moderation, such as This Is Fine.

  1. Moderators are not selected because they are domain experts in certain tags, but it so happens that you are an expert in one such tag. You see that several members of the community have elected to close a question as a duplicate, but you see that the duplicates don't actually answer the question as stated, nor do they provide a useful signpost for the asker. How do you proceed?

This might be the hardest question of the ten.

Without mod powers, it'd be a simple choice to vote to reopen, and post a comment explaining what I believe is wrong with the marked duplicate. The Reopen Vote queue would then bring the question to the attention of the rest of the community.

As a moderator, I wouldn't want to use my unilateral reopen vote to step on the toes of the community, but a wrong duplicate can be useless or harmful to the asker, especially if they're a new user and not yet familiar with how our Q&A site works. First I'd seek confirmation of my assessment of the incorrectness of the close votes, by asking in chat other users who have experience with that tag (which on Arqade typically means those who have played a certain game).
If that causes another user to cast a reopen vote, I'd leave the question alone for now, and maybe cast my own, final reopen vote once the question has gathered 3 or 4 already.
Should I not find any users who know about the tag, I would ask the asker if the duplicate has answered their question. If not, I would reopen and explain in more detail why.

Depending on how confidently I feel that the duplicates don't answer the question, I might skip some steps and reopen and comment sooner than I would for other questions.

  1. There is a high-rep user who is very active on the site, but frequently uses strong language which violates the Code of Conduct in their comments. When you warned them, they replied stating that the questions are of low quality which is why they left those comments. They also threatened to quit the site. Despite the warning, they continue to post similar comments. What steps, if any, will you take in order to address this situation? What if the comments were on Meta instead of main? Does that change your approach at all?

I have been on the receving end of this! Minus threatening to leave the site.

In my case, even a warning in a mod-PM didn't help me realize that my tone was too aggressive, which made a suspension necessary. After the suspension, I have been more careful with my language, so I would probably mimic those steps after consulting with my fellow moderators, if they deem it necessary as well. If this high-rep user would rather leave the site than be respectful, their contributions will be missed, but the more positive atmosphere on the site will encourage more new users to stay, who might in turn become high-rep users with many useful contributions.

I don't think Meta should allow any harsher language than the main site, if anything the opposite might be true. Since Meta is supposed to be a place for discussion and often disagreement, it is even more important for everyone to keep their manners civil. I would follow the same steps if these unfriendly comments were posted on Meta.

  1. We have a very active chat community, but at the end of the day, it is a very small part of our actual community. Sometimes, people discuss site policy in chat as if ruling decisions can be made there, instead of moving them to meta. How would you deal with this? How much value do you place on chat as a place of community consensus?

I have, as a regular user, asked people discussing site policy in chat to post their opinions on meta, where they've found more reception and feedback. It is easy to start a discussion in chat and get carried away, but chat is not and should not be the place for these matters. That said, chat is useful to get a quick idea of the community's feelings on a certain matter, but any new suggestions and decisions should be posted on Meta.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

On its own, an argument isn't necessarily bad, but comments might not be the best place for it. If an argument is proceeding along without any strong language and while being respectful, it might be necessary to move the comments to chat.

On the other hand, if the comments are unfriendly and using strong language, this becomes a similar situation to question 5. Again, both a healthy atmosphere and having good questions and answers are important for the site's growth, so the best outcome is for the user to realize that their contributions to the site do not outweigh the detriment they bring when they post harsh comments.

As in question 5, I would take the usual steps, with the agreement of other moderators: warning, suspensions of increasing duration, eventually permanent.

Just like post bans exist to show users who have posted low-quality questions and answers that we value good posts, suspensions exist to show users who have violate the Code of Conduct that we value a respectful atmosphere.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?
    How do you react, in particular, if nobody has communicated with the moderator regarding this action, or disagreed with it through voting, posting on meta, or any other means?

I would avoid taking any action until I've heard the moderator's reasoning for their decision. Then, if we're still taking different stances, I would most likely post on meta to bring the community's attention to it, and go along with whatever action is decided there.

Since this doesn't seem like a situation that requires special mod powers, it is better to avoid using them.

  1. A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?

Maybe not all that different than simply having high enough reputation. Whether we like it or not, high-rep users already carry just a bit more weight in their posts and comments, moderators just more so.

In the case of questions or answers, the fact that they were posted by a moderator wouldn't really feel all that different from a regular user. I already use my comments sparingly, so I don't think a diamond should make much of a difference. Additionally, it's usually easy to tell when a moderator is speaking as a moderator (warning commenters to be more calm or to not post answers in comments), and when they're simply requesting additional information like a regular user would.

  1. As a moderator, would you use your binding vote to unilaterally approve and reject suggested edits, or would you leave these to the community review vote?

I think it's helpful to let the community moderate content and learn from it, even in the case of very simple actions like rejecting spam or approving a fix to a typo. That said, I would most likely still hang around the suggested edit queue, but probably choose to skip a lot more than I do. I might use my vote to reject edits that deviate from the user's intention, as it's a type of edit I'm particularly careful with.

9

FoxMcCloud

  1. You (a moderator) and another community member both answer a question (not on Meta). The other answer is well written but (objectively) incorrect, and has gathered a similar amount of upvotes to yours. What do you do?

I would do what I always do, regardless if I had mod status or not. I would downvote the answer and leave a comment to say why I think the answer is wrong. This allows the other member to fix their answer and make it better. Once the answer is fixed, it could be better than my own, so I might end up deleting my own answer and upvoting the one that used to be wrong. I think this question is suggesting that with ultimate deleting powers, would I flat out delete a question that is wrong? I think giving users time to fix answers or improve them will increase retention and site activity, so I'd go with that approach even if I wasn't a mod.

  1. A relatively new community member has shown misgivings about an established site policy and has a suggestion to change the policy. Their suggested change (posted on meta) isn't being well received by community regulars and the debate appears to be drifting in an unfriendly direction.
    How do you approach and respond to this situation?

I feel like this question is broad so I'll answer it in steps. I personally like answers that are broken down and take into account all parts of the question. I did something like this here and I think because I took it in this direction, it helped the user understand what happened. You can also include both users in the answer and not just the person asking the meta question. I don't mind heated debates, and I think my actions would depend on just what kind of unfriendliness was going on. Racism, violence and bigotry have no place in modern society and I would immediately take action on these.

  1. The Bridge, our main chat room, is one of the most active on the network. Do you see the moderation of Arqade's chat rooms as part of your duties? If you're not active in chat currently, would you consider it part of the job to keep an eye on what's going on there?

I do think it would be part of my job, but not a top priority. It's a much more chill environment and that's where I'd like to see more activity. I feel like The Bridge is where you can really "let your hair down" so-to-speak and engage in a much more friendly banter without having to "limit thank you comments on answers".

  1. Moderators are not selected because they are domain experts in certain tags, but it so happens that you are an expert in one such tag. You see that several members of the community have elected to close a question as a duplicate, but you see that the duplicates don't actually answer the question as stated, nor do they provide a useful signpost for the asker. How do you proceed?

I would first leave a comment stating why I think it's not a dupe and vote to re-open. I think this question is stating "would you use your mod powers to reopen immediately?" My first course of action would never be to change something without the community voting on it. I'd use the question/answer portion of Arqade as a regular user and try to persuade the community to see the non-duplicate question as valid.

  1. There is a high-rep user who is very active on the site, but frequently uses strong language which violates the Code of Conduct in their comments. When you warned them, they replied stating that the questions are of low quality which is why they left those comments. They also threatened to quit the site. Despite the warning, they continue to post similar comments. What steps, if any, will you take in order to address this situation? What if the comments were on Meta instead of main? Does that change your approach at all?

I was once accused of not being nice in some of my comments once. In my case, I didn't think I was overly rude or anything, but I certainly wasn't as inviting as I could have been. When a user is rude and off-putting, new users won't come back. After a warning I would consult my other mods and talk about temporarily banning the user. Just because you have a lot of rep, doesn't mean you add to the community. 1,000,000 rep does not make you invulnerable to the rules. No it wouldn't change my opinion on meta or main.

  1. We have a very active chat community, but at the end of the day, it is a very small part of our actual community. Sometimes, people discuss site policy in chat as if ruling decisions can be made there, instead of moving them to meta. How would you deal with this? How much value do you place on chat as a place of community consensus?

Discussions and great ideas come up in casual conversation and it's much easier to discuss them in a chat format. I love this. I wouldn't want to discourage users from discussing rules or regulations in chat. Once a group of users have discussed a new rule and think it's a great idea or if they come up with a change to an existing rule, I'd encourage them to summarize it and THEN make a meta post about it. A great example of this is here. I hold the meta at a higher standard than chat and I wouldn't make any decisions solely based on chat.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I would message them personally and let them know. Maybe this person doesn't know that they are causing issues based on their comments! Open communication is key first and foremost. You can't discipline someone without giving them a chance to change first. They are clearly contributing to the site in a meaningful way with good answers, they just might be taking the comment section a little too seriously or something.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?
    How do you react, in particular, if nobody has communicated with the moderator regarding this action, or disagreed with it through voting, posting on meta, or any other means?

I'd chat with them about it. As a new mod, I might be missing something that I didn't know about. I might also change their mind after talking with them about it. Again, communication with me is very key. As a mod team, we should be able to agree on close/delete votes 99% of the time. If this should ever happen where we disagree, I feel like there is an underlying problem that needs to be addressed. This should be handled through discussions and not mod power VS mod power.

  1. A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?

Feels great! Gimme that diamond baby!!!

But really, it'll feel good. I have some higher quality answers and questions and some lower ones. Not everyone is perfect all the time and there is a gradual increase in quality from me over the years.

  1. As a moderator, would you use your binding vote to unilaterally approve and reject suggested edits, or would you leave these to the community review vote?

I think it's been pretty obvious from my previous answers that I'd leave the majority of things open to the community. Mods should only step in when absolutely necessary. The main thing I love about Arcade is that it is run by a group of people all at once.

  • 3
    These are mostly good answers; however, it's not possible for moderators to vote to reopen questions, they can just unilaterally close and reopen questions. You may need to change your approach for question #4. – Pikachu the Parenthesis Wizard Jun 3 at 21:51
  • 2
    @PikachutheParenthesisWizard Mods don't have the ability to vote to reopen like the rest of the community does? If that's truly the case, then I would not reopen it myself. I would want the community to decide to reopen it and I would only step in if I thought that the community was mishandling the situation. – FoxMcCloud Jun 3 at 22:11
  • 1
    RE: Q2 - For context, I made this question deliberately broad - this sort of situation happens often enough on meta that I felt it important to know how potential moderators would respond to it. Your answer mentions addressing 'both users' - Can you expand on how you would deal with a situation involving multiple involved people? – Robotnik Jun 4 at 0:27
  • 1
    @Robotnik I've seen these types of situations on meta before so I'm familiar with what you are talking about. You have to have the ability to 'read between the comments' and understand where these frustrations are coming from. The high rep user might be frustrated because they are familiar with the rules and the new user doesn't understand how/why we can't change a rule. You have to have the ability to describe the differences between the nuances to get the low rep user to understand (which I think I'm well versed to do) - at the same time you don't want to (1) – FoxMcCloud Jun 4 at 0:35
  • @Robotnik (2) completely disregard the high rep user who may escalating and causing more harm than good. My first go-to would be to address the speech that is being used and squash the argument. If a mod takes a side and makes a "decision" in this case, the argument is then over. Then we can now address the issues that arose in the first place to make me step in as a mod. I think the best thing to do is to let the frustrated users know where they went wrong and point out what specific comments we wouldn't allow and inform them how to get in touch with a mod ahead of time to avoid this again. – FoxMcCloud Jun 4 at 0:39
  • @FoxMcCloud thanks for clarifying, and best of luck! :-) – Robotnik Jun 4 at 1:33
7

Gigazelle

  1. You (a moderator) and another community member both answer a question (not on Meta). The other answer is well written but (objectively) incorrect, and has gathered a similar amount of upvotes to yours. What do you do?

The community at large has the tools to resolve this outside of moderation. Downvoting, paired with a comment explaining my reasoning is all that's needed. If the fellow user corrects their answer and participates in the conversation, I'd be happy to retract my downvote.

  1. A relatively new community member has shown misgivings about an established site policy and has a suggestion to change the policy. Their suggested change (posted on meta) isn't being well received by community regulars and the debate appears to be drifting in an unfriendly direction. How do you approach and respond to this situation?

Community members who care enough about site policy to post in meta is awesome, regardless of how well it might be received. Healthy debate is also great, and encouraged here. If said debate drifts in an unfriendly direction, I'd comment reminding fellow users to keep the tone respectful. Typically a gentle reminder does the trick; if it doesn't, or if posts start violating our code of conduct, I would delete violating posts and move the discussion to chat.

  1. The Bridge, our main chat room, is one of the most active on the network. Do you see the moderation of Arqade's chat rooms as part of your duties? If you're not active in chat currently, would you consider it part of the job to keep an eye on what's going on there?

Chat is an important part of the community - while I would consider it an ancillary part of moderation, I would feel like I'd simply be a participant there with the ability to moderate when needed. My experience with The Bridge is that it already has active moderator presence and is fairly self-governing.

  1. Moderators are not selected because they are domain experts in certain tags, but it so happens that you are an expert in one such tag. You see that several members of the community have elected to close a question as a duplicate, but you see that the duplicates don't actually answer the question as stated, nor do they provide a useful signpost for the asker. How do you proceed?

I have experienced a similar scenario on Arqade. In circumstances like this, both the question that's asked and the question as a duplicate lacks clarity. I would first comment on the duplicate question explaining the differences between the two, then edit both questions for clarification (being mindful to not change the meaning of either question). Once both questions have been clarified, I would nominate the question to be re-opened, and allow the community to determine how to proceed from there.

Bear in mind that this is dependent on my expertise of the tag; were I not an expert in the tag, I would not be in a position to provide that clarity between questions and lean much more on fellow community members and their expertise. I would not use my binding votes in cases where I don't have the right expertise to justify it.

  1. There is a high-rep user who is very active on the site, but frequently uses strong language which violates the Code of Conduct in their comments. When you warned them, they replied stating that the questions are of low quality which is why they left those comments. They also threatened to quit the site. Despite the warning, they continue to post similar comments. What steps, if any, will you take in order to address this situation? What if the comments were on Meta instead of main? Does that change your approach at all?

Users are not immune to code of conduct, regardless of their reputation. In fact, I would hold high-rep users to a higher standard, as they pose an example to newer users. There is no reason to post comments that lack respect, even if they might be frustrated with low-quality content.

The user has already been warned, so if they continue to exhibit behavior that violates the code of conduct, I would issue a temporary suspension. If they quit the site, that is their choice, but we have plenty of other community members here that are happy to help and show respect.

Respect should be universal here, regardless of location (meta/main site).

  1. We have a very active chat community, but at the end of the day, it is a very small part of our actual community. Sometimes, people discuss site policy in chat as if ruling decisions can be made there, instead of moving them to meta. How would you deal with this? How much value do you place on chat as a place of community consensus?

Chat is an excellent place to discuss and gain a consensus, but a poor place to make official. If a consensus is made on site policy, I would have those users create a meta post so it can be properly documented. If it also is received positively by the community, then we could consider making adjustments to site policy.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

It depends on the type of flag, but gauging from the question, I'd infer that these flags would be due to being overzealous in caring more about content than community. If there are any violations to code of conduct, they would be handled accordingly. If the user is simply being short or impatient with new community members, then I would interject where needed to help coach the user on being more considerate.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?
    How do you react, in particular, if nobody has communicated with the moderator regarding this action, or disagreed with it through voting, posting on meta, or any other means?

A meta post would absolutely be the best route to get this resolved. This would allow the community to reach an agreement on how we can proceed with the question, and allow both myself and the other moderator to proceed in alignment.

  1. A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?

Grateful, and confident that my existing conduct on the site has been an example to the community.

  1. As a moderator, would you use your binding vote to unilaterally approve and reject suggested edits, or would you leave these to the community review vote?

As a professional community manager, I believe in the power of community and have faith that they will act in the best interest of Arqade. I would only use my binding vote in cases where it is absolutely necessary.

3

The Mattbat999

Q. You (a moderator) and another community member both answer a question (not on Meta). The other answer is well written but (objectively) incorrect, and has gathered a similar amount of upvotes to yours. What do you do?

A. I would leave a comment on the other person's answer, explaining why it is incorrect. If the mistake(s) aren't corrected within a reasonable amount of time, I would downvote.

Q. A relatively new community member has shown misgivings about an established site policy and has a suggestion to change the policy. Their suggested change (posted on meta) isn't being well received by community regulars and the debate appears to be drifting in an unfriendly direction. How do you approach and respond to this situation?

A. Delete comments in which break the Code of Conduct, explain the deletion, then move the rest of the discussion into a seperate chat room, and keep an eye on the conversation.

Q. The Bridge, our main chat room, is one of the most active on the network. Do you see the moderation of Arqade's chat rooms as part of your duties? If you're not active in chat currently, would you consider it part of the job to keep an eye on what's going on there?

A. I see moderating the chat room an important, but not overwhelming, part of keeping our community together. One of the main things I like about chat is thay you can connect with other people, get to know them a little by talking, instead of reading their posts here on the main site. I think, personally, chat helps bring the whole community a little closer.

Q. Moderators are not selected because they are domain experts in certain tags, but it so happens that you are an expert in one such tag. You see that several members of the community have elected to close a question as a duplicate, but you see that the duplicates don't actually answer the question as stated, nor do they provide a useful signpost for the asker. How do you proceed?

A. I would first contact both the poster and the users that closed the questions, through a seperate chat room, and all of us discuss whether the question is actually a duplicate. If things are not resolved there, I would take it to Meta, and let the rest of the community decide.

Q. There is a high-rep user who is very active on the site, but frequently uses strong language which violates the Code of Conduct in their comments. When you warned them, they replied stating that the questions are of low quality which is why they left those comments. They also threatened to quit the site. Despite the warning, they continue to post similar comments. What steps, if any, will you take in order to address this situation? What if the comments were on Meta instead of main? Does that change your approach at all?

A. I would have to warn them a few times (2 to 4 times), then, if it continues, ban them for a week, and delete the vulgar language. If it continues past that, the bans would only increase in length. And no, it doesn't matter whether the post is on meta or main. Their high reputation doesn't give them permission to harass others with bad language.

Q. We have a very active chat community, but at the end of the day, it is a very small part of our actual community. Sometimes, people discuss site policy in chat as if ruling decisions can be made there, instead of moving them to meta. How would you deal with this? How much value do you place on chat as a place of community consensus?

A. I would have to remind the chat that any actual decisions for the site policy should be made in Meta, not a chat room. I think chat is important for hearing out other people's ideas, but, of course, any final decisions need to happen on Meta.

Q. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

First, i would try and sit down and discuss the issue with the user, and try to encourage them not to spark arguement so much. However, if they ignore my warning, i would have to contact other moderators and ask them to help me with the situation, even up to a temporary ban.

Q. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been? How do you react, in particular, if nobody has communicated with the moderator regarding this action, or disagreed with it through voting, posting on meta, or any other means?

A. I would contact the mod, and sit down and discuss it with them, and explain my thoughts on the action. If nothig is resolved, i would have to take it to the other moderators, or even Meta, and try to find a solution.

Q. A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?

A. Honestly? Nervous. Having that diamond is an important responsibility and privilege, but I think it will allow me to see that my words should be better, both in quality and kindness, than before.

Q. As a moderator, would you use your binding vote to unilaterally approve and reject suggested edits, or would you leave these to the community review vote?

A. Unless the edit completely ruins the quality of a question, or changes the question being asked itself, I would leave it to the community to vote on.

2

iVhagar.

I'm a very active SE member and am tossing myself into the frey, i'm running for moderator!

  1. You (a moderator) and another community member both answer a question (not on Meta). The other answer is well written but (objectively) incorrect, and has gathered a similar amount of upvotes to yours. What do you do?

I would have several approaches to this situation depending on the way that the answer was wrong.

  1. The opposing answer uses conjecture to draw a likely answer, but my answer is officially sourced and directly contradicts the other answer.

In this situation I believe that I would leave a comment explaining where they went wrong in their conjecture, then, I would wait for the user to respond to my comment and if they didn't edit to acknowledge that they messed up, I would proceed to down-vote.

  1. The other answer is correct but is misinterpreted by the answerer and they proceed to a false conclusion even though they had all the facts.

In this situation I would take the obvious route and leave a comment explaining where they either misread or misinterpreted. I would be very wary of down-voting unless they (the answerer) begin a futile argument that leads nowhere and is not productive, at that point I would down vote.

  1. The other answer is very strong but is completely based on conjecture and is not backed up by quotes and other official references.

In this situation, I would first down vote and then explain that they had made a mistake and should review some of the sources offered in my answer to improve their answer.

  1. A relatively new community member has shown misgivings about an established site policy and has a suggestion to change the policy. Their suggested change (posted on meta) isn't being well received by community regulars and the debate appears to be drifting in an unfriendly direction. How do you approach and respond to this situation?
  1. Top priority: remove any comments that violate the Code of Conduct
  2. Link the commenter to the Code of Conduct and politely remind them to be nice.
  3. Move any comments that are on topic and polite but might be banal to chat.
  1. The Bridge, our main chat room, is one of the most active on the network. Do you see the moderation of Arqade's chat rooms as part of your duties? If you're not active in chat currently, would you consider it part of the job to keep an eye on what's going on there?

Yes, I would consider it part of my job, but would view it as a smaller one. I would probably check in to the chatroom about every other day to check and see that the conversation was pleasant and non-violent/disruptive.

If a argument that started in chat started appearing on the main site, via comments or rude meta posts I would see to it that the argument was resolved in a mannerly fashion (we don't want anything left to stew) and warn any of the users against violating code of conduct rules (linked to above)

  1. Moderators are not selected because they are domain experts in certain tags, but it so happens that you are an expert in one such tag. You see that several members of the community have elected to close a question as a duplicate, but you see that the duplicates don't actually answer the question as stated, nor do they provide a useful signpost for the asker. How do you proceed?

Before I take any action, I would start up a chatroom with the users who closed the question to see if I am misinterpreting anything, then if the context provided there is not productive, I would open up a meta post similar to this one (over on sff) [How do we resolve this supposed dupe situation?](How do we resolve this supposed dupe situation?) and go with the consensus reached there.

  1. There is a high-rep user who is very active on the site, but frequently uses strong language which violates the Code of Conduct in their comments. When you warned them, they replied stating that the questions are of low quality which is why they left those comments. They also threatened to quit the site. Despite the warning, they continue to post similar comments. What steps, if any, will you take in order to address this situation? What if the comments were on Meta instead of main? Does that change your approach at all?

I would use essentially a three-strikes system. The user in question would get three warning via comment or chat message, but if they were continually ignore and they continued to abuse users, I would start to use the tools provided to me as a moderator. First, I would give them a temporary suspension (maybe 3 weeks to a month) then if the behavior continued when the user returned I would offer a once more escalated suspension (2-3 months) and then if they continued I would proceed to give them a several year suspension.

  1. We have a very active chat community, but at the end of the day, it is a very small part of our actual community. Sometimes, people discuss site policy in chat as if ruling decisions can be made there, instead of moving them to meta. How would you deal with this? How much value do you place on chat as a place of community consensus?

I would remind everybody making decisions there that the chat they are participating in is just a chat and that any decisions they hope to make should be moved to meta and then voted/commented on by the rest of the community.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Before taking any action, I would message the user via chat or comment letting them know that they are causing this. Next, I would start to try and work with them so that they could stop the negative reception in the comments section but if they do not respond, I would ask another mod for help and then if that failed, I would start up a chatroom discussing the possible suspension of the user in question.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been? How do you react, in particular, if nobody has communicated with the moderator regarding this action, or disagreed with it through voting, posting on meta, or any other means?

This I feel is a very important question. First and foremost (as is my approach to most of these questions) I would reach out to the moderator in question and see if we can come to a consensus and right our wrongs or at least understand each other. If the debate continues, I would proceed to...

  1. Open up a public chatroom, and invite all the mods to help me figure the situation out.

  2. Open up a meta post so that I could get the community's opinion and hopefully resolve the issue.

  1. A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?

I am proud of all my posts and I look forward to having them inspected so as I can hopefully improve both my asking and answering skills.

  1. As a moderator, would you use your binding vote to unilaterally approve and reject suggested edits, or would you leave these to the community review vote?

My policy would be patience young one. I would wait and really think through what I was approving before taking action, but I have been a pretty active editor on a few sites and I feel I can recognize un-helpful edits and helpful ones, but whenever i feel an inkling of doubt, I would leave it to the community.


Thanks for taking the time to read this and thanks for all the amazing questions.

Good luck to all!

  • 1
    Honestly, I don't see you having the experience on Stack Exchange to be suitable for a moderation position at this point. You haven't been around that long, haven't unlocked the basic community-moderation privileges yet and your posts so far aren't of a quality that I look for in a moderator. Clear communication is essential in such a position. – Mast Jun 10 at 20:53
2

Frank

  1. You (a moderator) and another community member both answer a question (not on Meta). The other answer is well written but (objectively) incorrect, and has gathered a similar amount of upvotes to yours. What do you do?

This is what comments are for; to explain why the answer is incorrect. I would also downvote the answer, and from there, see how the back and forth works out. We don't delete incorrect answers unless it has the potential to cause harm, so I will trust the community to see my side, and who knows? Maybe I have it wrong. That's not an uncommon occurrence.

  1. A relatively new community member has shown misgivings about an established site policy and has a suggestion to change the policy. Their suggested change (posted on meta) isn't being well received by community regulars and the debate appears to be drifting in an unfriendly direction. How do you approach and respond to this situation?

If comments are getting rude, they get deleted. Adding a reminder for people to keep it polite follows, and depending on how unwieldy the debate is getting, comments might be moved into a chat room. Generally, new users need a bit of direction and guidance when they first get here, and if they're open to some pointers, I'd explain why we work the way we do, and how they can than work that into their perspective. Perhaps that will help them see us differently, and can update their suggestion into something more acceptable.

  1. The Bridge, our main chat room, is one of the most active on the network. Do you see the moderation of Arqade's chat rooms as part of your duties? If you're not active in chat currently, would you consider it part of the job to keep an eye on what's going on there?

I don't think it's an absolute requirement, if the moderator is not present there. That said, if a moderator is in a chat room, it's part of their job to keep it on track. I'm almost always in the Bridge, and owner of our Monster Hunter chat (come join!), and that would be part of my role. I don't have to do it alone, though; there's many other owners and mods that can work together to keep it all running smooth.

  1. Moderators are not selected because they are domain experts in certain tags, but it so happens that you are an expert in one such tag. You see that several members of the community have elected to close a question as a duplicate, but you see that the duplicates don't actually answer the question as stated, nor do they provide a useful signpost for the asker. How do you proceed?

This is what being an exception handlers are for. I'd reopen the question, and explain why the duplicate was incorrect. That part is important; there needs to be accountability for these actions, and I think it gives confidence to the community knowing their mods are being open and aboveboard with their actions.

  1. There is a high-rep user who is very active on the site, but frequently uses strong language which violates the Code of Conduct in their comments. When you warned them, they replied stating that the questions are of low quality which is why they left those comments. They also threatened to quit the site. Despite the warning, they continue to post similar comments. What steps, if any, will you take in order to address this situation? What if the comments were on Meta instead of main? Does that change your approach at all?

If it violates the Code of Conduct, it goes. No matter how passionate we get here, we all need to remember that there's a person on the other side. Rudeness is not tolerated, from anyone, for any reason. There are specific moderator templates to deal with these situations; delete the comments and add a comment warning, then a moderator warning, then a week suspension, getting stronger and stronger until the behaviour stops.

Meta is still subject to the Code of Conduct; it has to be, or we'd never get anything done. I might be a bit more forgiving on Meta, but that's just from the warning end of things. Comments will still be deleted if they're rude, and while I value a long term user, there is no excuse to be rude.

  1. We have a very active chat community, but at the end of the day, it is a very small part of our actual community. Sometimes, people discuss site policy in chat as if ruling decisions can be made there, instead of moving them to meta. How would you deal with this? How much value do you place on chat as a place of community consensus?

I don't think we should discount hashing out preliminary positions on the Bridge; it's a good place to get other's perspectives, and see sides of the debate you had originally missed. Ideally, it can be a sounding board for a potential proposal, but if it's a bad idea, then it can save time by using chat instead of Meta. For good ideas, though, changes need to be where all the community can see it. Meta's not a great place to really surface consensus, but until we get something better, it's all we have.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Arguments show passion in the problem space; I don't think it's so much the argument itself that's the issue, but how it gets resolved in the end. If it devolves into rudeness and name calling, then a warning or suspension is likely in order. If it just ends, without either side being convinced, there's nothing wrong with that. Probably time for a comment cleanup or move to chat, but arguments, by themselves, are not inherently bad; they're a sign of engaged users

Flags are flags; I'd clean up comment threads, but actual user action would depend on what happened.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?
    How do you react, in particular, if nobody has communicated with the moderator regarding this action, or disagreed with it through voting, posting on meta, or any other means?

Communication is key. I already don't shy away from calling mods on decisions I disagree with, so the difference would be we'd take it private. I hold views strongly, but loosely; there's no guarantee I'd make the right call, and getting a competing perspective is important, I feel. Things don't happen in a vacuum, so talking it out is important.

  1. A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?

Honestly? It's a big burden. I try very hard to follow the Code of Conduct; I make my disagreements known strongly, but honestly, without trying to attack the poster. If I encounter comments or posts of mine that I feel no longer reflect my views, I'd likely try to set the record straight, either by editing posts, or adding another comment to reflect that I no longer agree with my previous statement, while leaving it there. I think being human is important; it's how I approach any work, and I find it makes me more approachable to admit where I made mistakes. I'd bring that same personal policy to moderation work.

  1. As a moderator, would you use your binding vote to unilaterally approve and reject suggested edits, or would you leave these to the community review vote?

Yes, I would, for those I feel are good edits. I'm not going to seek them out, but I do spend a good amount of time in the review queues, and I use Skip very frequently.

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