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There's a blog entry about "subjective question guidelines" and this is enforced on the programmers beta site

Are we going this way?

I think this deserves discussion.

Update: If yes, will the the subjective/argumentative close reason be changed to

Not constructive

This question does not meet enough of our six guidelines for constructive subjective questions.
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    Regardless of our stance on subjective questions, please do not interpret those guidelines as having solid footing in allowing or disallowing Game Recommendations. Nearly any game recommendation can be asked in a manner of an objective list of games, but this does not resolve the majority of issues regarding our support for them. – Grace Note Oct 13 '10 at 20:39
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I think we can allow good subjective questions without becoming "openly accepting of subjective questions" or removing the "Subjective and Argumentative" close reason.

If we exclude game recommendations, which I've mentioned are a bit of a special case, then our "Closed as Subjective and Argumentative" list looks something like the following.

We're not like Programmers - we are striving to be an authoritative source of Q&A for Gaming. To that end, it is important to not turn a focus away from objectivity, so closing questions that are too subjective, or which are subjective and argumentative, should remain a task we continue to do.

This does not prohibit us from allowing subjective content period. Strategy questions tend to be pretty subjective in some senses of the word, but usually qualify for 5, if not all 6, of those guidelines. Indeed, if you follow those guidelines, you'll probably end up with a question that's acceptable. badp links a pretty good example, which qualifies for all 6 in my eyes.

We shouldn't look at the guidelines as a measure of "allowing subjective content". Instead, it's more of a better way for us to moderate what is acceptable without changing any of our existing policy; a supporting element, if you will. We've been doing pretty good about this even before the guidelines were introduced.

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I think there's no inherent problem in giving good subjective questions a chance. Indeed, I asked one and there were no complaints with it.

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You should allow players to provide analysis and recommendations of games to people. For example "if you are looking for a shooter, metro 2033, borderlands, or bioshock may not have the depth you want, because they focus on other gameplay elements. Those games are good if you are used to and enjoy shooter-style controls but appreciate rpg elements and fantasy storylines."

You should close questions for being too argumentative, trolling, immature, or not providing a useful discussion. (people start calling each other names, etc)

We aren't here like programmers who just pure answers to questions. One of the functions of the gaming community is to help each other find games worth playing and avoid wasting our time and money. "I like game X, will I like game Y?" is perfectly legitimate.

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  • See @Grace's comment on the original question. While the discussion of what to do about Game-rec is ongoing it is categorically not germane to this question. While Subjective is often used as the reason on Game-rec close votes, it doesn't really get to the heart of why those who dislike recommendations want them gone - that is a separate discussion of our engines ability to handle repositories of information like recommendations. Similarly, the guidelines discussed in this question are in no way relevant to that discussion. – LessPop_MoreFizz Oct 17 '10 at 3:40

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