3 added 10 characters in body
source | link

I'm not sure if this will help but another user suggested my input, so here goes:

I've been a member here for quite some time now, and still have very little rep compared to users who have been here for much less time. ThatsThat's for two reasons, first being I am not as interested in the methodical management, and the other is I've been deliberatlydeliberately taking baby steps. Generally speaking, I've been taking an approach that most things I do are wrong, and will be corrected accordingly by the community.

I generally make meta posts with the closing thought of, "This is definitlydefinitely going to be butchered, but at least I'll learn why". I've learned that anytime anything is in what even MIGHT be a grey area, its much less fustratingfrustrating to do nothing, and step back and let the community as a whole handle it. And sometimes that was clearly a good idea.

Using the 11 game reference question as an example, I saw that question early this morning, viewed it, and immidiatlyimmediately threw it out my window. That was a box of nails I wanted nothing to do with, and even if I did, I knew the community wouldn't be able to quickly agree on how to handle it. So, in a situation where I knew nobody knew what to do, I correctly did nothing. When you have year long plus members who know how the site works in and out, arguing about how to do something, itsit's clearly over my head. I'm still trying to learn whats 'right', and trying to do that when whats 'right' isn't the same day-to-day is extremely difficult. Add in a situation that directly influences what people eventually decide is 'right' and you've got a crock pot with a crack in it.

This seems like it would be even harder for you, because rather than doing nothing, your attempting to be the DRIVE. Your trying (it seems to me) to be PART of the storm of change that this site deals with every day. It's important that you note I used the word STORM, because thatsthat's exactly what it is, and it has all the qualities of a bad one. Its chaotic, its painfullpainful, it changes on a whim, and it shows up and leaves sometimes without warning. You seem to want clear cut yes and no situations, and thatsthat's normally ok to expect from stackexchangeStack Exchange. However the very concept of a gaming stackexchangeStack Exchange website combats clear cut yes and no. Nothing destroys absolutes like games, therefore the questions involving said games are going to dance all over the idea of 'clear cut'.

I think if you jumped in the Storm, and rode it out, and didn't really put any final thoughts into anything until the Storm is over (at least until the next one) you'd find yourself enjoying a challenging, positive, eductionaleducational learning system; rather than hating a controversial, hypocritical, negative one.

I'm not sure if this will help but another user suggested my input, so here goes:

I've been a member here for quite some time now, and still have very little rep compared to users who have been here for much less time. Thats for two reasons, first being I am not as interested in the methodical management, and the other is I've been deliberatly taking baby steps. Generally speaking, I've been taking an approach that most things I do are wrong, and will be corrected accordingly by the community.

I generally make meta posts with the closing thought of, "This is definitly going to be butchered, but at least I'll learn why". I've learned that anytime anything is in what even MIGHT be a grey area, its much less fustrating to do nothing, and step back and let the community as a whole handle it. And sometimes that was clearly a good idea.

Using the 11 game reference question as an example, I saw that question early this morning, viewed it, and immidiatly threw it out my window. That was a box of nails I wanted nothing to do with, and even if I did, I knew the community wouldn't be able to quickly agree on how to handle it. So, in a situation where I knew nobody knew what to do, I correctly did nothing. When you have year long plus members who know how the site works in and out, arguing about how to do something, its clearly over my head. I'm still trying to learn whats 'right', and trying to do that when whats 'right' isn't the same day-to-day is extremely difficult. Add in a situation that directly influences what people eventually decide is 'right' and you've got a crock pot with a crack in it.

This seems like it would be even harder for you, because rather than doing nothing, your attempting to be the DRIVE. Your trying (it seems to me) to be PART of the storm of change that this site deals with every day. It's important that you note I used the word STORM, because thats exactly what it is, and it has all the qualities of a bad one. Its chaotic, its painfull, it changes on a whim, and it shows up and leaves sometimes without warning. You seem to want clear cut yes and no situations, and thats normally ok to expect from stackexchange. However the very concept of a gaming stackexchange website combats clear cut yes and no. Nothing destroys absolutes like games, therefore the questions involving said games are going to dance all over the idea of 'clear cut'.

I think if you jumped in the Storm, and rode it out, and didn't really put any final thoughts into anything until the Storm is over (at least until the next one) you'd find yourself enjoying a challenging, positive, eductional learning system; rather than hating a controversial, hypocritical, negative one.

I'm not sure if this will help but another user suggested my input, so here goes:

I've been a member here for quite some time now, and still have very little rep compared to users who have been here for much less time. That's for two reasons, first being I am not as interested in the methodical management, and the other is I've been deliberately taking baby steps. Generally speaking, I've been taking an approach that most things I do are wrong, and will be corrected accordingly by the community.

I generally make meta posts with the closing thought of, "This is definitely going to be butchered, but at least I'll learn why". I've learned that anytime anything is in what even MIGHT be a grey area, its much less frustrating to do nothing, and step back and let the community as a whole handle it. And sometimes that was clearly a good idea.

Using the 11 game reference question as an example, I saw that question early this morning, viewed it, and immediately threw it out my window. That was a box of nails I wanted nothing to do with, and even if I did, I knew the community wouldn't be able to quickly agree on how to handle it. So, in a situation where I knew nobody knew what to do, I correctly did nothing. When you have year long plus members who know how the site works in and out, arguing about how to do something, it's clearly over my head. I'm still trying to learn whats 'right', and trying to do that when whats 'right' isn't the same day-to-day is extremely difficult. Add in a situation that directly influences what people eventually decide is 'right' and you've got a crock pot with a crack in it.

This seems like it would be even harder for you, because rather than doing nothing, your attempting to be the DRIVE. Your trying (it seems to me) to be PART of the storm of change that this site deals with every day. It's important that you note I used the word STORM, because that's exactly what it is, and it has all the qualities of a bad one. Its chaotic, its painful, it changes on a whim, and it shows up and leaves sometimes without warning. You seem to want clear cut yes and no situations, and that's normally ok to expect from Stack Exchange. However the very concept of a gaming Stack Exchange website combats clear cut yes and no. Nothing destroys absolutes like games, therefore the questions involving said games are going to dance all over the idea of 'clear cut'.

I think if you jumped in the Storm, and rode it out, and didn't really put any final thoughts into anything until the Storm is over (at least until the next one) you'd find yourself enjoying a challenging, positive, educational learning system; rather than hating a controversial, hypocritical, negative one.

2 added 208 characters in body
source | link

I'm not sure if this will help but another user suggested my input, so here goes:

I've been a member here considerably longer than youfor quite some time now, and still have considerably lessvery little rep compared to users who have been here for much less time. Thats for two reasons, first being I am not as interested in the methodical management as you are, and the other is I've been deliberatly taking baby steps. Generally speaking, I've been taking an approach that most things I do are wrong, and will be corrected accordingly by the community.

I generally make meta posts with the closing thought of, "This is definitly going to be butchered, but at least I'll learn why". I've learned that anytime anything is in what even MIGHT be a grey area, its much less fustrating to do nothing, and step back and let the community as a whole handle it. And sometimes that was clearly a good idea.

Using the 11 game reference question as an example, I saw that question early this morning, viewed it, and immidiatly threw it out my window. That was a box of nails I wanted nothing to do with, and even if I did, I knew the community wouldn't be able to quickly agree on how to handle it. So, in a situation where I knew nobody knew what to do, I correctly did nothing. When you have year long plus members who know how the site works in and out, arguing about how to do something, its clearly over my head. I'm still trying to learn whats 'right', and trying to do that when whats 'right' isn't the same day-to-day is extremely difficult. Add in a situation that directly influences what people eventually decide is 'right' and you've got a crock pot with a crack in it.

This isseems like it would be even harder for you, because rather than doing nothing, your attempting to be the DRIVE. Your trying (it seems to me) to be PART of the storm of change that this site deals with every day. It's important that you note I used the word STORM, because thats exactly what it is, and it has all the qualities of a bad one. Its chaotic, its painfull, it changes on a whim, and it shows up and leaves sometimes without warning. You seem to want clear cut yes and no situations, and thats normally ok to expect from stackexchange normally. However the very concept of a gaminggaming stackexchange website combats clear cut yes and no. Nothing destroys absolutes like games, therefore the questions involving said games are going to dance all over the idea of 'clear cut'.

I think if you jumped in the Storm, and rode it out, and didn't really put any final thoughts into anything until the Storm is over (at least until the next one) you'd find yourself enjoying a challenging, positive, eductional learning system; rather than hating a controversial, hypocritical, negative one.

I'm not sure if this will help but another user suggested my input, so here goes:

I've been a member here considerably longer than you, and have considerably less rep. Thats for two reasons, first being I am not as interested in the methodical management as you are, and the other is I've been deliberatly taking baby steps. Generally speaking, I've been taking an approach that most things I do are wrong, and will be corrected accordingly by the community.

I generally make meta posts with the closing thought of, "This is definitly going to be butchered, but at least I'll learn why". I've learned that anytime anything is in what even MIGHT be a grey area, its much less fustrating to do nothing, and step back and let the community as a whole handle it. And sometimes that was clearly a good idea.

Using the 11 game reference question as an example, I saw that question early this morning, viewed it, and immidiatly threw it out my window. That was a box of nails I wanted nothing to do with, and even if I did, I knew the community wouldn't be able to quickly agree on how to handle it. So, in a situation where I knew nobody knew what to do, I correctly did nothing. When you have year long plus members who know how the site works in and out, arguing about how to do something, its clearly over my head. I'm still trying to learn whats 'right', and trying to do that when whats 'right' isn't the same day-to-day is extremely difficult. Add in a situation that directly influences what people eventually decide is 'right' and you've got a crock pot with a crack in it.

This is even harder for you, because rather than doing nothing, your attempting to be the DRIVE. Your trying (it seems to me) to be PART of the storm of change that this site deals with every day. It's important that you note I used the word STORM, because thats exactly what it is. You seem to want clear cut yes and no situations, and thats ok to expect from stackexchange normally. However the very concept of a gaming stackexchange website combats clear cut yes and no. Nothing destroys absolutes like games, therefore the questions involving said games are going to dance all over the idea of 'clear cut'.

I think if you jumped in the Storm, and rode it out, and didn't really put any final thoughts into anything until the Storm is over (at least until the next one) you'd find yourself enjoying a challenging, positive, eductional learning system; rather than hating a controversial, hypocritical, negative one.

I'm not sure if this will help but another user suggested my input, so here goes:

I've been a member here for quite some time now, and still have very little rep compared to users who have been here for much less time. Thats for two reasons, first being I am not as interested in the methodical management, and the other is I've been deliberatly taking baby steps. Generally speaking, I've been taking an approach that most things I do are wrong, and will be corrected accordingly by the community.

I generally make meta posts with the closing thought of, "This is definitly going to be butchered, but at least I'll learn why". I've learned that anytime anything is in what even MIGHT be a grey area, its much less fustrating to do nothing, and step back and let the community as a whole handle it. And sometimes that was clearly a good idea.

Using the 11 game reference question as an example, I saw that question early this morning, viewed it, and immidiatly threw it out my window. That was a box of nails I wanted nothing to do with, and even if I did, I knew the community wouldn't be able to quickly agree on how to handle it. So, in a situation where I knew nobody knew what to do, I correctly did nothing. When you have year long plus members who know how the site works in and out, arguing about how to do something, its clearly over my head. I'm still trying to learn whats 'right', and trying to do that when whats 'right' isn't the same day-to-day is extremely difficult. Add in a situation that directly influences what people eventually decide is 'right' and you've got a crock pot with a crack in it.

This seems like it would be even harder for you, because rather than doing nothing, your attempting to be the DRIVE. Your trying (it seems to me) to be PART of the storm of change that this site deals with every day. It's important that you note I used the word STORM, because thats exactly what it is, and it has all the qualities of a bad one. Its chaotic, its painfull, it changes on a whim, and it shows up and leaves sometimes without warning. You seem to want clear cut yes and no situations, and thats normally ok to expect from stackexchange. However the very concept of a gaming stackexchange website combats clear cut yes and no. Nothing destroys absolutes like games, therefore the questions involving said games are going to dance all over the idea of 'clear cut'.

I think if you jumped in the Storm, and rode it out, and didn't really put any final thoughts into anything until the Storm is over (at least until the next one) you'd find yourself enjoying a challenging, positive, eductional learning system; rather than hating a controversial, hypocritical, negative one.

1
source | link

I'm not sure if this will help but another user suggested my input, so here goes:

I've been a member here considerably longer than you, and have considerably less rep. Thats for two reasons, first being I am not as interested in the methodical management as you are, and the other is I've been deliberatly taking baby steps. Generally speaking, I've been taking an approach that most things I do are wrong, and will be corrected accordingly by the community.

I generally make meta posts with the closing thought of, "This is definitly going to be butchered, but at least I'll learn why". I've learned that anytime anything is in what even MIGHT be a grey area, its much less fustrating to do nothing, and step back and let the community as a whole handle it. And sometimes that was clearly a good idea.

Using the 11 game reference question as an example, I saw that question early this morning, viewed it, and immidiatly threw it out my window. That was a box of nails I wanted nothing to do with, and even if I did, I knew the community wouldn't be able to quickly agree on how to handle it. So, in a situation where I knew nobody knew what to do, I correctly did nothing. When you have year long plus members who know how the site works in and out, arguing about how to do something, its clearly over my head. I'm still trying to learn whats 'right', and trying to do that when whats 'right' isn't the same day-to-day is extremely difficult. Add in a situation that directly influences what people eventually decide is 'right' and you've got a crock pot with a crack in it.

This is even harder for you, because rather than doing nothing, your attempting to be the DRIVE. Your trying (it seems to me) to be PART of the storm of change that this site deals with every day. It's important that you note I used the word STORM, because thats exactly what it is. You seem to want clear cut yes and no situations, and thats ok to expect from stackexchange normally. However the very concept of a gaming stackexchange website combats clear cut yes and no. Nothing destroys absolutes like games, therefore the questions involving said games are going to dance all over the idea of 'clear cut'.

I think if you jumped in the Storm, and rode it out, and didn't really put any final thoughts into anything until the Storm is over (at least until the next one) you'd find yourself enjoying a challenging, positive, eductional learning system; rather than hating a controversial, hypocritical, negative one.